USA: The “exaggerated, compressed, but accurate” Maps To The Stars gets a release date

According to BoxOfficeMojo, Maps To The Stars will release in the US on February 27, 2015.

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We can’t help but wonder if the film is getting pushed away from a fall release and the releases in other countries (already out in the UK, releasing on Halloween in Canada and if you’re in France (or have a multi region player), you can buy the Bluray/DVD HERE) for a reason. Maybe it hits too close to home?

75Los Angeles Magazine explored the message of the film and hit it squarely – “Maps to the Stars Grapples with the Movie Business’s Most Complicated Character: Hollywood Itself”:

David Cronenberg’s Maps to the Stars is a Hollywood monster movie in which Hollywood is the monster. When Mia Wasikowska gets off the cross-country bus amid the sunshine and palm trees, she might be Naomi Watts arriving dumbfounded and dreamy in David Lynch’s 2001 Mulholland Drive but for the glint of recognition in her eyes and the mysteries of her past lurking behind the burn scars on her body. Wasikowska’s estranged family includes a self-help-guru father, who insists he loves her even as he makes clear he never wants to see her again, and a basket-case mother managing the acting career of a post-rehab son, whom the sister once tried to set on fire. The young woman wrangles a job—“For a disfigured schizophrenic,” observes her brother, “you’ve got this town pretty wired”—as a “chore whore” for a fading Hollywood luminary played by Julianne Moore, who’s desperate for the starring role in a biopic about her own abusive movie-star mother. Incest both sexual and creative connects everyone to everyone else. On Cronenberg’s map, the coordinates overlay each other; the revelation of secrets is less important than the madness that secrets engender.

Click HERE to continue reading the article. Screenwriter, Bruce Wagner, said via Thompson on Hollywood, “I’ve given you the lay of the land as I see it, saw it, and lived it.” and always the provocateur, David Cronenberg, has been direct about his feelings on the film and it’s relation to Hollywood.

Esquire: Everyone in Maps to the Stars is fundamentally awful and driven by a repellent amount of egomania. Is Hollywood really that bad?
Cronenberg: In short, yes. I live in Toronto. I dip my toe into the Hollywood tar pit every once in a while, and I can say that my experience of it would very much confirm the insights in the movie. It’s exaggerated and compressed, of course, but I think it’s pretty accurate.

E: So, everyone just floats around on a sea of fake emotion?
C: Absolutely. There’s always an agenda and strange personal manoeuvring. I flirted with a studio for a while back there [in 2008], when I was going to adapt the Robert Ludlum novel The Matarese Circle. I met with Denzel Washington, and spent some time with Tom Cruise. So I had the meetings, I had the experiences, but didn’t get to make the movie [the studio, MGM, declared bankruptcy; the film was abandoned]. I’ve had enough experiences over the years to know that all the resonances in Maps to the Stars ring true.

maps-nooooClick HERE to read more of his interview with Esquire. John Cusack doesn’t mince words and labels Tinsel Town a whorehouse to the Guardian.

Maps to the Stars broods on how celebrity corrupts the fallible. It’s also something of a bitchfest; a blood-letting that Cusack enjoys having a stake in. Hollywood today is closer to Wagner’s vision than we realise, he says. It’s no longer a place, it’s a nostalgic idea. The mega-corporations have stepped in, bringing with them the era of the 50-producer movie. In modern Hollywood the franchise is king, the star is used as leverage. “You can’t make it up,” says Cusack. “It’s a whorehouse and people go mad.”

Julianne Moore doesn’t see Maps To The Stars as a film about Hollywood and elaborates with the Irish Independent:

For Moore, this was never a film about Hollywood – which is “just a place where people make movies,” she notes. “Really, this is a movie about people who are so desperate to be seen and heard and acknowledged as human beings, and they’re seeking outside validation to obtain that, by being famous, celebrities or whatever… it’s really about who we are as human beings and what people want, and how sometimes they’re not able to get it.”

Robert Pattinson also seems to agree with Moore when speaking to the Independent:

“I’ve met characters that are pretty similar. Everyone’s saying the films biting, but I think it’s sympathetic to a host of characters. Women like Havana: in reality people would despise her, they don’t have friends for a reason, but I don’t think anyone comes out of the movie hating her and that’s testament to Julianne. It’s a bunch of weirdos who spend time self-obsessing and talking about it afterwards.”

Whatever the issues are, we hope the film and Moore still receive a qualifying run for award season, reported HERE. A few of us on staff have seen the film and think she’s simply sensational. A ball of fire you can’t turn away from.

75j

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